DTM RS6

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This very special Audi RS6 Avant once belonged to professional skier, car enthusiast, and envy generator Jon Olsson. The widebody stance was inspired by German DTM cars, and Olsson decided that he wanted one for the road. After owning and winter driving a couple of Lamborghins and an R8 (all with ski boxes on their roofs), it was time for a change. Former chief engineer at Koenigsegg Leif Tufvesson was gifted the task of overseeing the design envisioned by Olsson. The result was something that far surpassed the meager 500 horsepower of an actual DTM car. Upgrades included twin 18 karat gold anodized turbochargers, custom Intrax suspension, and the biggest brakes that Stertman Motorsport could fit under the wheels, in addition to a decent amount of one-off carbon fiber body pannels and aero bits. The DTM RS6 produced 950 horsepower on pump gasoline and north of 1000 on race fuel. Olsson sold the car in June 2015 after which it was tragically stolen at gunpoint while filming a promotional video in Amsterdam. After turning the car off the thieves were unable to start it again as the keys were left behind with the owner. It was found burnt out in a parking garage. A tragic death for such an amazing and unique car.

Posted @Whippstagram on Instagram, Nov 25th 2015

DTM RS6

Volvo’s BTCC Racing Wagon

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After seven years absent from any form of motorsport activity, Volvo had decided it was time to get back into racing. The British Touring Car Championship was decided on as the ideal place to showcase Volvo’s new 850, which aimed to be more of a driver’s car with sportier handling than previous models. Initially, the saloon version of the car was supposed to be raced by the factory team, but by the time engineers from Steffansson Automotive arrived at Volvo to pick up the bodyshells only the wagon versions were ready. With the start of the season closing in fast, and after some reassuring wind tunnel testing, the wagon was cleared for racing. Its long flat roof actually provided excellent downforce without the use of a spoiler, and the car was nicely composed in long sweeping bends. Sharper corners proved trickier for the 850 as its odd weight distribution caused it handling problems at slower speeds. This didn’t stop it’s pilots, Jan Lammers and Rickard Rydell, from cornering hard and often on two wheels. The cars performed reasonably well, qualifying and finishing in the upper middle of the pack, but a rule change the following season saw the wagon body style outlawed by the BTCC. Volvo was back the next year with saloon versions of the 850 which performed better and won six races over the course of the 1995 season.

Posted @whippstagram on Instagram, Nov 23rd 2015.

Volvo’s BTCC Racing Wagon