Meet the Ferrari Engined GT 4586

Oh to be a pro drifter, with sponsors who have deep, deep pockets. Ryan Tuerck, pro drifter and engine swapper extraordinaire, is at it again. Tuerck, along with what I’d imagine to be a massive, huge, gigantic amount of Gumout’s money and engineering magic from Huddy Motorsports present this: the GT 4586. V8 swaps in agile sports cars are nothing new, but they’ve never been done like this before.

The Ferrari V8 (F136, nerds) shoehorned into this GT 86 was used in the F430, California, and 458. It would have been easier to use one from a California because of its location in that car, but they wouldn’t have been able to call it GT 4586, would they? Out went the 2.0 litre Subaru boxer, and in moved the 4.5 litre V8 turned around 180 degrees from its home in a 458. The bottom of the windscreen frame was cut out to accommodate the engine’s throttle bodies and a very clever intake system fabricated which goes down through the dash and firewall, drawing air from outside the front quarter panels. Custom headers were fabricated to fit behind the front bumper and exit ahead of the front wheels. Opinions vary on whether the engine sounds as good here as it does in its natural habitat.

The radiator is moved to the trunk and fed cool air by a Le Mans style cowl mounted on the GT 4586’s roof. Hot air exits through vents in the deck lid. The V8 is mated to a 5 speed sequential racing transmission with a limited slip diff between the rear wheels. In the 458 this engine produces 570 horsepower. While the altered intake/exhaust paths may change this, the GT 4586 still has plenty of go, especially with all those bespoke racing goodies. The car will neither compete in Formula D nor see public roads (legally at least) so it’s been made extra strong at the expense of lightness with braces welded from the strut towers to the firewall and a full roll cage.

Oh to be a pro drifter.

Photos by Larry Chen, Speedhunters

Posted @Whippstagram on Instagram, Wednesday November 2nd 2016.

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Meet the Ferrari Engined GT 4586

Group B Evolved: 288 GTO Evoluzione

The Ferrari 288 GTO has some fantastically special cars in its family tree. It was the first Ferrari to bear the GTO name since the legendary 250 GTO, and its crazy cousin, the 288 GTO Evoluzione, served as the prototype for the equally legendary F40. AND it was designed to compete in Group B, the holy grail of motorsport lunacy. Crikey. 

Unfortunately for the 288 GTO, Henri Toivonen and Sergio Cresto’s fatal crash in the 1986 Tour de Corse put an end to the 600 horsepower monsters. Group B was banned just as the GTO was about to step into the fray. Based on the 308 GTB to save money and construction time, the 288 was in reality a very different car. It was wider, lower, and packed with goodies like upgraded suspension, extra lights and a racing transmission mated to a 2.9 litre twin-turbo V8. It produced 400 horsepower, and was the first road-legal production car to hit 300 kph. 

Not content with their amazing creation, Ferrari set to work once more. They wanted something nastier, scarier, more evolved. The 288 was lightened to a featherweight 2072 lbs, and the boost was turned up so that the engine now produced 650 horsepower. Incredible lightness, power, and an aerodynamically revised body put the Evoluzione’s top speed at a terrifying 225 mph. 272 288 GTOs were produced, but just 5 Evoluziones were ever built. Miraculously none of them were crashed as a result of monstrous turbo-lag and all of them survive to this day.

Posted @Whippstagram on Instagram, Wednesday September 28th 2016.

Group B Evolved: 288 GTO Evoluzione

Danger and Glamour: Mille Miglia

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The original Mille Miglia is one of motorsport’s legendary races, run at a time when health and safety came second to excitement. The thousand mile race over open public roads was conceived by an Italian Count in protest of the Italian Grand Prix being moved from his hometown of Brescia to Monza. The track was set as a lap of Italy from Brescia to Rome and back, and entry was restricted to unmodified production cars. Out of 77 starters only 51 made it to the finish line of the very first Mille Miglia. The race cemented the legendary status of marques such as Ferrari, Maserati, Porsche, Mercedes, BMW and Alfa Romeo, regularly attracting 5 million spectators along its route. Who wouldn’t want to see beautiful cars tear by on open beautiful roads?

Unlike modern rallies, the Mille Miglia sent the slowest cars out onto the course before the more powerful factory-backed competitors. Each car was given a number based on the time at which it started the race, so Sterling Moss’s legendary #722 Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR set off at 7.22 am. He and navigator Denis ‘Jenks’ Jenkinson set the absolute record for the thousand mile lap with a time of 10 hours, 7 minutes and 48 seconds. Their average speed over that time was an eye-watering 97.9 mph/157.6 km/h. The race was held twice in its original format after that record-setting run, but the time was never beaten.

While probably for the best, it’s a shame that there aren’t many races left that match the drama and danger of the Mille Miglia. Holding it on public roads was divine madness. One year, German driver Hans Herrmann at the wheel of a low-slung Porsche 550 Spyder saw the gates of a railway crossing begin to lower as he approached. Tapping the back of his navigator’s helmet to tell him to duck, he floored the nimble little Porsche and flew under the barrier just before the train passed. That was the kind of race that the Mille Miglia was. Unfortunately, you’re only lucky so many times. At the 1957 running Spanish driver Alfonso de Portago, desperate to win, waited too long to change tyres on his 4.2 litre Ferrari. He lost control and crashed, killing himself, his navigator, and nine spectators. Five of those were children. The race was subsequently banned, and is now held as a timed rally at legal speeds open to pre-1957 cars which attended or raced in the original Mille Miglia.

Posted @Whippstagram on Intsagram, Wednesday June 29th 2016

Danger and Glamour: Mille Miglia

Ferrari 330 P4

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The 330 P4 embodies the glamour of 60s Sportscar racing in the flowing lines of its beautiful body. Packing a 4.0 litre V12, it’s got a voice to match the drama of its physical form.

Ferrari’s P series of sports prototypes came as a rebuttal to Ford’s dominance with the GT40. The Colombo V12 found in the P3 was Scuderia Ferrari’s first to feature fuel injection, and produced 450 horsepower at 8000 rpm(!). Thanks to its powerhouse motor and lightweight components the racer could hit 199 mph in a straight line.

The P series cars were a resounding success. At the 1967 24 hours of Daytona a P3/4, P4, and 412 P crossed the finish line three abreast, mirroring Ford’s triumphant finish at Le Mans the previous year with their GT40s. The 1-2-3 finish proved that Maranello could still take the fight to Detroit.

Posted @Whippstagram on Instagram, May 11th 2016.

Ferrari 330 P4

Driving Nirvana

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Picture this: it’s 1961 and you’re a wealthy Californian. The sun is shining as you round another breathtaking corner on the Pacific Coast Highway in your shiny red 250 GT California. The fresh ocean air surrounds you, filling the cabin and your lungs. Dropping a gear, you hear the 3.0 litre V12 in front of you sing as you power through the bend. You’ve got 280 horsepower under your right foot, and miles of twisty roads ahead. Does life get any better?

That’s exactly the scene Ferrari’s American dealers had in mind when they asked Enzo to chop the roof off his 250 GT Berlinetta. They believed that California was the market for a beautiful, comfortable, fast convertible, and they were absolutely right.

The 250 GT California SWB came with the same race-derived Colombo V12 as the rest of Ferrari’s 250 Series. Handling was improved over its LWB older brother thanks to smaller dimensions. It featured aluminium body panels and four-wheel disc brakes courtesy of Dunlop. While designed to be an elegant convertible, the California still demonstrated Ferrari’s racing prowess. Privateers would cruise to the racetrack in comfort, go out and embarrass purpose built racecars, and then cruise home again in the evening. The 250 GT California is the embodiment of speed, luxury, and grace that Ferrari is known for.

Posted @Whippstagram on Instagram, April 20th 2016.

Driving Nirvana

Ferrari Killer: Ford GT40

Ferrari Killer: Ford GT40

The Ford GT40 was designed to end Ferrari’s dominance in endurance sports car racing. The Italian marque had been victorious at the 24 Hours of Le Mans six consecutive times between 1960-1965, and Henry Ford II’s bitter rivalry with Enzo Ferrari made him determined to win with an American car. The GT40 wasn’t an immediate success, but fortunes soon changed when Carroll Shelby was given control of the racing program in 1965. In 1966, GT40s recorded 1-2-3 finishes at the 24 Hours of Daytona, 12 Hours of Sebring, and most importantly for Henry Ford II, the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The Le Mans victory was repeated at the next three runnings of the race, and Ferrari’s dominance was ended.

By James Walker

Posted @Whippstagram on Instagram, April 2015

Ferrari Killer: Ford GT40